Facebook Officially Comments On LaptopMemo About Facebook Phone

Rather then stay on the laptop and play with code or multiplayer video games like Bad Company 2, Facebook’s Rebecca Hahn decided to comment on my earlier post regarding the breaking news of a “Facebook Phone”. Spoiler: she shoots it down with facts.

The story is not accurate. Facebook is not building a phone. Our approach has always been to make all phones and apps more social, not build a phone. Current projects include include everything from an HTML5 version of the site to apps on major platforms to full Connect support with SDKs to deeper integrations with some manufacturers.

Our view is that almost all experiences would be better if they were social, so integrating deeply into existing platforms and operating systems is a good way to enable this. For an example, check out Connect for iPhone and the integration we have with contact syncing through our iPhone app. Another example is the INQ1 phone with Facebook integration (the first so-called “Facebook Phone”).

The people mentioned in the story are working on these projects. The bottom line is that whenever we work on a deep integration, people want to call it a “Facebook Phone” (even internally) because that’s such an attractive soundbite, but our real strategy is to make everything social and not build one phone or integration.

Facebook: No Way, We’re Not Building A Phone Fools

In spite of the “evidence” mentioned in my earlier post, and Arrington’s, Facebook Spokesperson Jaime Schopflin commented (to Mashable!) that they’re NOT making a Facebook Phone, and mentioned that “building phones is just not what we do”.

“The story, which originated in Techcrunch, is not accurate. Facebook is not building a phone. Our approach has always been to make phones and apps more social. Current projects include include everything from an HTML5 version of the site to apps on major platforms to full Connect support with SDKs to deeper integrations with some manufacturers.  Our view is that almost all experiences would be better if they were social, so integrating deeply into existing platforms and operating systems is a good way to enable this. For an example, check out Connect for iPhone and the integration we have with contact syncing through our iPhone app.  Another example is the INQ1 phone with Facebook integration (the first so-called ‘Facebook Phone’). The people mentioned in the story are working on these projects. The bottom line is that whenever we work on a deep integration, people want to call it a “Facebook Phone” because that’s such an attractive soundbite, but building phones is just not what we do.”

This is all we have to know. More on this if it develops.

Twidroyd 4.0 docs leak, bring Twitter-like UI

With the launch of the new Twitter.com, all apps are now in superb denial. Twidroyd, by far one of the most popular Android Twitter apps, has responded to the new iPad app and official website appearances. Or at least they will this coming Tuesay, as found in a leaked dev document. New features include simpler settings, more organized UI, and an almost perfect recreation of the official interfaces. As soon as it comes out, I’ll be taking a hands-on with it, OK friends?

Source: Scribd

Facebook Is Developing A Phone

According to my not-so-acquainted-fellow-blogger Michael Arrington, TechCrunch has a pretty solid idea that the duo of Joe Hewitt and Matthew Papakipos (get it, HP?) are “secretly working on the project,” who previously worked on things like the Facebook iPhone app and previously involved in a big way with Google’s Chrome OS until June of this year. Facebook is keeping all of this tightly wrapped, even to its own employees, and the price point might be featurephone competition (something like $50 or lower).

What makes this very intriguing is the fact that Android’s lead project manager, Erick Tseng, who was even a spokesperson for the entire Android brand, defected from Google in May to be Facebook’s lead developer of mobile products, thus making this under-wraps project even more interesting, albeit very shady.

On a personal, or more professionally, an editor’s note, this might be the same situation as the Nexus One, where it was “dogfed” to Google employees as their official phone, then released to the public, ands subsequently turned into a dev-only phone. As with everything in technology journalism and blogging, take every you se, hear, and even almost taste, “with a grain of salt”.

Meaning that the whole thing could be real, or a load of —- air.

Source: TechCrunch

Weekend Poll: Did You Buy Halo: Reach?

In one day it generated $200 million dollars on September 14th; the launch day. It’s the highest grossing entertainment record in one day worldwide. And it is awesome. Although, mind you, I don’t own the new Xbox 360 S (or an Xbox at all), but I am springing for one soon enough, and Halo: Reach will be my first pick.

So while you all are having cocktails, reading books, or chatting with friends this weekend, did you buy Halo: Reach?

[polldaddy poll=3783002]

Hands-On: Internet Explorer 9 Beta

Is it safe to say I like the new Internet Explorer, even a little? Besides a new UI, simpler settings, and improved performance, this is the same IE everybody loves (or was it hated?) except with an Acid3 test score of 95/100. Either way, it’s sitting right next to the Chrome icon on my laptop. That takes a lot for something to make it next to my Chrome shortcut, let me tell you!

Back on topic, here’s some screenshots of the new browser, and here’s where you can get the new Internet Explorer 9 Beta at beautyoftheweb.com.

Internet Explorer 9 Gallery