Creative Assembly Announces Shogun 2: Rise Of The Samurai DLC

 So far, there has been two DLCs for the Total War: Shogun 2 game, hich is very well on its way to being a game of the year. However none of those DLCs showed the rise of the samurai class, otherwise known to historians as the Gempei War, which according to CA, was “a conflict between six legendary clans of the Taira, Minamoto and Fujiwara families”, and the end of which brought about the very first shogunate(400 years before the Ashikaga Shogunate), rather than the Edo-period depicted in the base version of Shogun 2. The new DLC will launch sometimes in September, and is currently on the Steam store for pre-purchase at $10. Via: Steam

Samsung Galaxy S II U.S. Reveal Scheduled For August 29th

That’s the big day of Androd 2.3-era smartphones, with some of the highest specs in the industry. Samsung is planning a press event in NYC just for the occasion, which will probably present a Galaxy S II device that is different for each of the major United States carriers, and all using 4G technologies (WiMax, HSPA+, and the best of all, LTE). Whether or not we’ll see just one Galaxy S II device or more is unkown, however with all of those months of waiting, it would be awfully terrible of Samsung to disappoint. We’ll be there at 6PM on August 29th, so make sure to check back then!

Games And Google+: It’s Here And It Wants To Pwn N00bs

 Google has gone ahead and released Games for Google+ (and with the option to “mute” them). That’s right, just like Facebook, except without all the clutter, ads, and stuff like that. It will have all the usual things, like achievements, recent games played, which games certain circles are playing, and so on. The launch titles include, Bejeweled, Angry Birds, Dragon Age: Legends and a few more seen at the source link. Also, here’s what Google+ mainly has to say:

“Today we’re adding games to Google+. With the Google+ project, we want to bring the nuance and richness of real-life sharing to the web. But sharing is about more than just conversations. The experiences we have together are just as important to our relationships. We want to make playing games online just as fun, and just as meaningful, as playing in real life.”

And interestingly, how it’ll work:

“When you’re ready to play, the Games page is waiting—click the games button at the top of your stream. You can see the latest game updates from your circles, browse the invites you’ve received and check out games that people you know have played recently. The Games page is also where your game accomplishments will appear. So you can comfortably share your latest high score—your circles will only see the updates when they’re interested in playing games too.”

“If you’re not interested in games, it’s easy to ignore them. Your stream will remain focused on conversations with the people you care about.”

Google also let game devs know how they can code games for Google+, seen at their Developer Blog. 


Flame Red Nintendo 3DS Landing September 9th For $169.99

So even though it was used in promos ad looks pretty good, the flame red Nintendo 3DS was never launched at the same time that the black and blue versions were. That will all change September 9th, when it goes on sale for $169, the new price for a Nintendo 3DS portable console. “With major upcoming releases in the Star Fox, Pokémon and Mario series, in addition to downloadable offerings from Nintendo eShop, Nintendo Video and Netflix, the system offers new and fun experiences to owners on a daily basis,” Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime said. Nintendo still seems rather optimistic about the 3DS, and has sold 830,000 3DS units in the U.S. since its launch on March 27th. Press release after the jump.

HTC Investing $300M In Beats Audio For Smartphones

So, yes. That “big announcement” by HTC CEO Peter Chou was blown to AllThingsD recently. All it seems to be is a partnership with Beats by Dr. Dre by investing a healthy $300 million which gives HTC exclusive rights to use Beats Audio in their mobile devices, of which Peter Chou stated the first of their Beats line would launch later in 2011. This also meaning that the webOS devices from HP and their laptops will cease use of the Beats branding, which is more of a blow in the face than anything else. 

Amazon Creates Cloud Reader To Fight Against Apple’s App Store Terms, Works On iPad Like A Boss

What if you’re a company like Amazon, and Apple’s newer App Store policies blocked you from doing certain things? Even if you complied (Which Amazon has), then you’d still be pretty pissed, right? Well, that’s where Amazon is brilliant: they’ve created a rich, great-looking, fast, and simple web app: Amazon Cloud Reader. And you guessed it: it works on Mac, PC, only on Chrome and Safari web browsers, and works like a charm on the iPad, since Amazon says it’s optimized for it anyways.  Books can be made available offline and synced with  limited number of devices. And while the iPhone is not currently supported, I think that Amazon could very well be working on a version for it also — it wouldn’t make much sense if they didn’t. Good going here, Amazon.

Via: Amazon Cloud Reader

Toshiba Debuts The First Glasses-Free 3D Laptop: The Qosmio F755

At the time of this writing, I am using a ASUS G74SX 3D laptop, which is by no means a little thing (8-9 pounds, much like the Qosmio F755). It can play most games on their highest settings without coughing, and has a 3D screen to boot. However, the 3D function requires those heavy Nvidia 3D Vision glasses. Enter the Toshiba Qosmio F755, which uses a quad-core 2GHz Intel Core i7 processor, NVIDA GeForce 540M graphics (weaker than the GeForce 560M the G74SX 3D has), and the prime feature: a 15.6-inch auto-stereoscopic display 3D display. Translation: sans-glasses 3D, by use face-tracking technology in the webcam. Other things to note of is that the F755 includes 6GB of RAM, a 750GB hard disk, Blu-ray drive, and the partnership between Nvidia and Toshiba, where 2D games willbe converted to 3D, by November. It launches August 17th for $1,700. Via: Wired