Google Chrome 17 Released With Pre-Loading And Download Screening

20120208-204300.jpgGoogle has just released the Chrome 17 update, which adds pre-loading to the browser. You can now have web pages instantly load when you start typing them out in the Omnibox, and Chrome will begin to understand web pages you visit every frequently and will pre-fetch them as well. This also applies to web pages Google “thinks” you will visit, so they will also pre-load to make your visits faster, per their algorithm.

Also included is download screening for .exe files. Nice stuff for a incremental update.

Via: Google Chrome Blog

Google Voice for Android updated for Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich (and latter versions)

In a very nice trend seen by app developers (and Google) apps are being updated for Ice Cream Sandwich with fantastic new UIs and features. For example, take the sorry-looking Google Voice app: it has been turned around with a new UI along with another couple of minor things, like bug fixes. There is also the addition of asynchronous SMS sending, which allows you to send messages when users are offline, queuing them for later delivery. Snazzy stuff. The app is currently available for download on the Android Market. Via: The Next Web

Valve adds a Portal Space Core to Skyrim via mod, using Bethesda’s software

I love Valve. What game developer would go through the trouble of demonstrating how awesome another developer (in this case, Bethesda) is, by integrating one of their best characters into Skyrim — a core? It is to be the delightful Space Core (it yells, “SPAAAAAAAACE!”), but anyways the idea is that it’s dropped into Tamriel and now you can fly around in it yelling “spaaaaace”. That’s awesome, Valve.

More importantly however is the launch of the Creation Kit for Skyrim, allowing you to search for Skyrim mods, rate them, and upload your own, just like Valve has done. It’s all good with the The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim.

Via: Fall Of The Space Core, Vol 1. (Skyrim mod)

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Micro Four Thirds camera announced

This is a new Micro Four Thirds camera announced by Olympus, designed to look like professional film cameras from the ’50s and ’60s. It has a 1.44-megapixel electronic viewfinder, two programmable dials provide manual control, and the MFT cameracomes in black or the classic chrome finish, as you see above. Interestingly, it’s very small, measuring 4.8 inches wide and 1.8 inches deep, so there’s no room for a flash, but there is for an added battery pack section, also seen above. As for shooting specs, there’s a 16.1-megapixel sensor with 5-axis image stabilization, a decent ISO range of 200-25,600, and support for 1080p HD video recording.

E-M5 will be out in April 2012 for a body-only price of $999.99, with a kit lens option including a $1,099.99 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 II R lens, and a $1,299.99 bundle containing the higher-end, weather-sealed 12-50mm f/3.5-6.3 EZ lens that launched back in December of 2011.

Google makes Chrome for Android a reality

It has been made official for devices running Ice Cream Sandwich: Google Chrome for Android, as a beta. Features include the usual speed and performance associated with Chrome. Additional features include: a fresh UI (Duh!), Google is touting a new, more natural tab management interface, bookmark and tab synchronization with the desktop, support for incognito windows (this is Chrome, after all), and little something called Link Preview that makes it easier to select the right link in a densely-populated area of a page; a preview of sorts.

But! Chrome for Android! That’s good enough news on its own. Exciting and fast is all you need to describe it as a whole.

Via: Google, Android Market

Nikon D800 full-frame DSLR: 36.3 megapixels, $3000, coming in March

This is Nikon’s king camera. It has a full-frame, massive 36.3 megapixel sensor, and can produce TIFF files as large as 212MB (that’s a big photo). Besides the sensor there’s a 3.2-inch, 921,000-dot LCD, Expeed 3 processor that makes startup time as fast as 0.12 seconds, the new 51-point autofocus system with 15 cross-type sensors, iSO range up to 6400, expandable to 25,600, and a USB 3.0 port built-in, a first for any Nikon camera. For storage you can use an SD card or CF card,  and can shoot 1080p video at 30 or 24 frames per second, or 720p at 60 or 30 frames per second with B-Frame compression, which should allow room for higher-quality H.264 MP4 video.

Oh, and for those that shoot fashion, a variant is available — the D800E with antialiasing feature removed (better for fashion shots while retaining full image quality) and a $300 price increase to $3,299.95. The release is pegged for sometimes in March. Press release at the end of the post.

Rdio’s music streaming app now works with Android 4.0, redesigned as well

Not only music streaming service Rdio has redesigned their Android app to look very fresh and clean, but now it is compatible with Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich devices. Fantastic news, no doubt. The app, now available on the Android Market for free (excluding the $9.99 monthly subscription fee) has a new homescreen, UI, and is faster with much better attention to detail, including a remote control feature where music is controlled from the lock screen.

Via: Rdio (Android Market)

Google unveils “Solve for X” think-tank operation

This is Google’s “Solve for X”, a think-tank, TED-like operation that for the past few months has been very covert, and that by next Monday will have all of its new “shoot-for-the-stars” ideas posted on YouTube. Some of these ideas include: transforming education, improvements in agriculture, synthetic biology, and carbon-negative biofuels. There is even evidence of being able to pitch and idea for Solve for X and have a talk. And with that, we shall see what potentially innovative and groundbreaking ideas Solve for X by Google has in store.

Via: Solve for X