Nokia Suffers $196 Million Loss, But Finds Shred Of Hope In Results

LUMIA 920 IN YELLOWNokia has picked up the spear and is ready for battle again: for Q1 2013 the company lost €150 million (roughly $196 million) on €5.85 billion ($7.65 billion) in revenue over the quarter, but despite the losses, today’s financial results are improving, slowly but surely. Their Devices and Services division posted a small loss of €42 million ($55 million), its HERE mapping division lost €97 million ($127 million), but has the positive results from Nokia Siemens Networks, which turned last year’s €1 billion ($1.31 billion) loss into a solid €3 million ($3.92 million) profit.

Looks like Nokia will live to see another day.

Via: Nokia (PDF)

Samsung Galaxy S 4 Will Hit The U.S. Hard, On 7 Carriers This Month

galaxy-s-4Are you prepared for the media and retail onslaught that will be the Galaxy S 4? Of course not. Until today, the scope of Samsung’s launch hasn’t exactly been measured (it’s huge). That being said, the Galaxy S 4 will debut in the United States this month, on 7 individual carriers — AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon Wireless, along with regional carriers U.S. Cellular, Cricket and C Spire.

Microsoft Continues To Profit Off Of Android, Now Using Foxconn

IMGP5689The never-ending stream of Microsoft doing good business doesn’t end. Foxconn, the Taiwanese manufacturer that produces an amazing 40 percent of the world’s consumer electronic devices (!!!) will soon be sending plentiful sums of money to Microsoft.

The reason being? In the past (circa 2012), Microsoft has convinced the likes of Samsung, HTC, and LG to license their patents as long as they make Android devices. More explicit details aren’t to be had, but there is confirmation that what Foxconn will be paying for is the Android and Chrome OS devices it makes, including televisions, smartphones, and tablets.

Via: Ars Technica 

Here’s What Google Glass Looks Like Straight Out Of The Box

glass-explorer-editionThis may very well may be the first Google Glass developer unit to be unboxed. Besides a charger and micro USB cable, there’s a pretty luxurious Glass carrying pouch and a clear visor in addition to the tinted one, so you either go sun-Glass or night-Glass. The owner of the above Glass unit is Google+ user Brian Allgood (lucky dude!), who was an I/O developer, simply waiting for the arrival of his paid $1,500 unit — price which will come down when a consumer release approaches.

Google Glass can’t come soon enough.

Via: Google+

HTC One Launching On T-Mobile Come April 24th

HTC One near handJust like other smartphones in its 4G LTE range, T-Mobile will offer the HTC One for $99 on a new 2-year contract alongside their new carrier service plans. The only exclusive feature of the HTC One to T-Mobile is Wi-Fi calling, which integrates nicely with the support of 4G HSPA+ and LTE. T-Mobile’s current portfolio of LTE phones, includes the iPhone 5, the Galaxy S4, and the BlackBerry Z10.

Interestingly, the news comes from a tweet sent by T-Mobile to a possible customer; thanks for that.

Via: T-Mobile (Twitter)

Eric Schmidt Details 1.5 MIllion Android Activations, Everyday

eric-schmidtAt Dive Into Mobile today, Executive Chairman of Google, Eric Schmidt, confirmed that the company is now seeing 1.5 million Android activations per day, which is up from 1.3 million per day last fall and a slight jump to  1.4 million as of last month. They’re baby steps to the big 2 million, but still are precursors to the already giant Android marketshare.

AT&T’s Galaxy S 4 Shipping April 30th For $199/$639

gs4-attpageWith April slipping further and further away, it comes to our attention that the Galaxy S 4 is rapidly approaching. That is, at least on AT&T, where the GS4 will be available in White Frost or Black Mist colors. More importantly, it will ship by April 30th and has an off-contract price tag of $639 ($199 w/ two-year agreement) for the 16GB model. Add two-day shipping and you’d see your GS4 no later than May 3rd. Sounds good.

ViaAT&T

Google Releases Mirror API: You Can Make Glassware — They’re Glass Apps!

google-glass-flexibilityGoogle isn’t holding off when it to Glass, and why should they? That’s why the Mirror API has been released: it’s basically an online resource of comprehensive documentation, complete with example code for developers who want to add apps to the Glass interface. The only weird thing going on here is that the application programming interface is still in a limited developer preview, but still, that won’t stop devoted devs.

Oh, and what is a Glass service called? Google says you should call them “Glassware”. Not bad, actually.

Via: Google Glass Mirror API