Hardware

Here Are The (Prototype) Wireless Controllers For The HTC Vive VR Headset

20150715_142612Wading it through storms and showers in New York City (to the Dream Hotel, no less) this week was thoroughly worth it — because, a demonstration of HTC’s Vive virtual reality headset was in order. The experience is fluid despite needing more work in the user interface (which is designed as a gallery that you “walk” in), as well as the two mounted sensors that will be simplified for consumer use — they fill the room with lasers and in layman’s terms, assist in the calibration and recognition of the user’s real-world space.

And surprisingly, HTC is close to Valve, evening going as far as developing a Portal VR demo.

Samsung Developing 11K Mobile Displays That Give 3D Illusion

L1010577 copyYes, Samsung is taking the screen game to next-gen levels. Currently their flagship phones have quad-HD displays, but the South Korean conglomerate is looking to increase that state to 11K — yes, higher than a 4K display, which is just gaining traction, and even more pixel-dense than an 8K display, which is just making its technological debut. 11K would represent a whopping 2,250 pixels per inch and in doing so, would replicate a 3D effect sans glasses, so says Samsung.

That’s one of the main reasons Samsung is partnered with 13 companies to work on the “EnDK” project, and with the South Korean government investing $26.5 million over five years — this isn’t a science fair project, by any stretch.

Via: Electronic Times

Oculus Touch: “Natural Input VR Controller” Is A Thing Now

Screen Shot 2015-06-11 at 2.32.59 PMAbove is the Oculus Touch being used in conjunction with the Oculus Rift. 

The primary function of the Touch is to provide a more natural input for playing VR games with the just-finalized VR headset. While it won’t debut in Q1 2016 alongside the Oculus Rift’s consumer launch, the Touch will accompany the company’s catalog later on in 2016.

Some notes on what the two controllers actually are: they have capacitive touch input, gesture recognition, haptic feedback and a set of traditional buttons as well.

In short, you’ll be able to “feel” certain things in the VR space thanks to the Oculus Touch — which will complete the experience. Why can’t this come any sooner?

Via: Oculus

Oculus Will Team Up With Microsoft To Bundle Xbox Controller With The Rift

oculus_stepintotherift1It’s a very interesting partnership and further cements Oculus’ place as the first solid purveyor of VR gaming. The Oculus Rift final consumer model has been unveiled as part of a press conference today, and with it, the consumer bundle. An Oculus Rift kit will include a wireless Xbox One controller, the Rift headset, and a small table-top camera that observes LED markers to track head movements.

Some notes on the new Rift headset: Oculus managed to include a pair of headphones capable of 360 immersion, a low latency tracking system that’s been refined over the course of the past few years, and finally, two OLED screens.

On top of all of that, Rift will work natively with Windows 10 come its launch in Q1 2016.

Via: Oculus

Samsung Unveils It Has Mirror And Transparent OLED Displays

Samsung-Display]-55-inch-Transparent-OLED_1_1Straight from the future, indeed.

Showcased in Hong Kong, Samsung’s new mirror and transparent OLED displays are less a thing of concept and more a preview of the company’s plans to come. The displays are going to be integrated with Intel’s RealSense technology, meaning that the mirror display, for example, can be used as a “virtual fitting room,” made possible by Intel’s own 3D cameras and an “automated library of stored perceptions” — basically, a user can try on clothes, and jewelry before actually trying them on, to see if they fit.

The transparent OLED displays? Well, Samsung has plans for that also: interactive ads, again making use of Intel RealSense technology and gesture control.

It will take Samsung time to bear fruit of this cutting-edge tech, bu tit will happen; after all, this is Samsung we’re talking about here: a paragon of screens across all ranges.

ViaSamsung

Google Cardboard Gets Updated: Expeditions For Classrooms, iOS/Android Support

Screen Shot 2015-05-28 at 2.37.12 PMGoogle Cardboard supports both Android and iOS, fitting phones up to 6-inches, requires just three steps to fold together, and uses a new button to simplify the process of using it across phones. And, of course, it’s still made of cardboard.

To bring virtual reality to education, Cardboard’s Expeditions allows teachers to receive a box filled with Google Cardboard units, phones, and a teacher tablet — allowing for field trips, to everywhere, for just about any classroom.

To record and share virtual reality, GoPro partnered with Google to produce a 360 degree camera array, to be part of the Jump initiative: to easily record, share, and catalog stereoscopic VR video.

YouTube will support Jump, which means that VR experiences will be possible through the app, with Google Cardboard and a phone being the tools needed.

Finally: Here’s The Final Oculus Rift, Launching In 2016

oculusCompared to the prototypes over the last few years that have garnered Oculus Rift worldwide attention, including an acquisition from Facebook last year, the final version of the Oculus Rift will take all of that and deliver on another level.

Specs are still being kept under wraps, but the new consumer-ready Oculus Rift will launch in early 2016, with better ergonomics, tracking capabilities, a much better design, and of course — top-notch games and tech demos that support it.

Fun (virtual) times are ahead. Via: Oculus

The Cost To Your Business When The Power Fails

There’s no question that a power failure can be a nuisance to your business. But have you ever stopped to consider what a loss of power actually costs your business? Power outages are virtually inevitable and certainly unpredictable, and can cause significant losses for businesses — thus they should always have a backup plan in place to deal with such eventualities. Whether small or large, a business should always have a contingency plan in place to minimize the losses associated with power outages. One of the best options is to invest in an uninterrupted power supply, or UPS.

Not convinced yet? Let’s look at the potentially disastrous impact that a power outage can have on a business.